Learning lessons from Guardiola

“When they (the players) don’t get the message, don’t understand the message, it’s the coach’s problem, my problem. All the managers in the world, it doesn’t matter how good you are, if your players don’t understand what you are looking for or what you want, it makes no sense.”

 

“As so often, Guardiola sounded as though he thought of himself as a missionary spreading the light of civilisation to a dark and distant land, unable to hide his horror at the depths of mindless savagery across which he has stumbled. He should have noticed by now that this doesn’t play well with the public. ”

(Ken Early, The Irish Times)

 

Guardiola: ‘Did you hear Benatia’s instructions?

Kimmich: ‘Sorry Pep, I didn’t.’

Guardiola: ‘F***! You were meant to move into centre midfield!’

Kimmich: ‘I’m really sorry. I just didn’t hear him.’

Guardiola: ‘I wanted you to move in front of the defensive line and maintain that position but instead you moved away from that organising position and we lost control. I need you to listen when people pass on my instructions.’

Kimmich: ‘I’m so sorry. I had no idea…’

Up to that point, the conversation is all hairdryer treatment but then Guardiola hugs his young player.

Guardiola: ‘You were brilliant out there today, Josh. Really, really good. I told you could do it!’

Kimmich: ‘Thanks Pep. It was a hard game but I did okay in the end.’

Guardiola: ‘What do you mean “okay”? You f***ing aced it. You were b****y sensational, Josh. Sensational! I’m so proud of you.’

In that conversation there is a hint of how Guardiola works: the intensity, the passion, and obsession with detail, which, to be frank, begins to grate on players by the third or fourth year but can transform teams in the early days. But it also shows the humanity and his ability to inspire young men. It is a formula all the great managers have.”

(Rob Draper, MailOnline)

 

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An excerpt from “The age of reason”

“The continually progressive change to which the meaning of words is subject, the want of an universal language which renders translation necessary, the errors to which translations are again subject, the mistakes of copyists and printers, together with the possibility of wilful alteration, are of themselves evidences that human language, whether in speech or in print, cannot be the vehicle of the Word of God.—The Word of God exists in something else.”

Thomas Paine

I remember when I was still in secondary school, how impactful this paragraph had on me. It was just so enlightening, so well written, so…enchanting. I shared this with Yuxuan on our way to Hooked, (a wonderful restaurant serving excellent fish dishes but sadly closed down on my third visit to Jonathan) and he too appreciated the grandeur of Paine’s insight.

Those were the days, when spending $35 on a meal was something unheard of, when I was so mesmerized with anti-religion arguments (I hope to be able to express my progression since then on this blog sometime), when I was…young.

A golden piece of advice from Luke

Luke 6:32 – 6:36 NKJV

32 “But if you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners love those who love them. 33 And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? For even sinners do the same. 34 And if you lend to those from whom you hope to receive back, what credit is that to you? For even sinners lend to sinners to receive as much back. 35 But love your enemies, do good, and lend, hoping for nothing in return; and your reward will be great, and you will be sons of the Most High. For He is kind to the unthankful and evil. 36 Therefore be merciful, just as your Father also is merciful.

HK Style Steamed Fish Sauce

Ingredients:

AAA premium seasoned soy sauce for seafood

Ginger

Coriander Roots

Coriander Leaves

Spring Onions

Rock Sugar (Whi

Plum Blossom Brand Shao Hsing Hua Tiao Jiu

 

Instructions:

Fry off the ginger first, then coriander roots, over a high heat

Add the Soy Sauce

Add in the coriander leaves (torn into two), spring onions, rock sugar

Add the Wine

Once beautifully seasoned, remove drain and serve with fish

 

The Scientific Ideal

“I do remember one formative influence in my undergraduate life. There was an elderly professor in my department who had been passionately keen on a particular theory for, oh, a number of years, and one day an American visiting researcher came and he completely and utterly disproved our old man’s hypothesis. The old man strode to the front, shook his hand and said, “My dear fellow, I wish to thank you, I have been wrong these fifteen years”. And we all clapped our hands raw. That was the scientific ideal, of somebody who had a lot invested, a lifetime almost invested in a theory, and he was rejoicing that he had been shown wrong and that scientific truth had been advanced”

Richard Dawkins

 

Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven

Had I the heavens’ embroidered cloths,
Enwrought with golden and silver light,
The blue and the dim and the dark cloths
Of night and light and the half light,
I would spread the cloths under your feet:
But I, being poor, have only my dreams;
I have spread my dreams under your feet;
Tread softly because you tread on my dreams.

William Butler Yeats

Roast Chicken Breast

For salads, sandwiches or even as a main

 

Room Temperature Chicken Breast (scored and fillet separated)

Combine Naturel EVOO, Knorr Chicken Stock Cube and Masterfood Thyme and rub

Leave for about 30minutes

Grill on griddle pan, flipping each side every 30 seconds until done

Let the chicken rest for 10minutes

 

What we can learn from Abraham Lincoln

Excerpts from Leadership lessons from Abraham Lincoln, Diane Coutu

“History also shows that it’s essential to know how to connect to the larger public, whether that’s through radio, in the case of Franklin Roosevelt, or in Lincoln’s case, through speeches that were filled with such poetry and clarity that people felt they were watching him think and that he was telling them the truth.”

“I would add here that one more success factor is key for great leadership, be it in business or politics, and it’s one that’s usually overlooked. As a leader you need to know how to relax so that you can replenish your energies for the struggles facing you tomorrow.”

“Lincoln went to the theater about a hundred times while he was in Washington. And although he suffered from a certain melancholy, he had a tremendous sense of humor and would entertain people long into the night with his stories. Franklin Roosevelt was the same way. He had this cocktail hour every evening during World War II when you just couldn’t talk about the war. He needed to remain free from thinking about the bad things for a few hours. Or he would play with his stamps. This ability to recharge your batteries in the midst of great stress and crisis is crucial for successful leadership.”

“You also have to be able to figure out how to share credit for your success with your inner team so that they feel a part of a mission. Basically, you want to create a reservoir of good feeling, and that involves not only acknowledging your errors but even shouldering the blame for the failures of some of your subordinates. Again and again, Lincoln took responsibility for what he did, and he shared responsibility for the mistakes of others, and so people became very loyal to him.”