Two significant Guardiola moments

  1. “As so often, Guardiola sounded as though he thought of himself as a missionary spreading the light of civilisation to a dark and distant land, unable to hide his horror at the depths of mindless savagery across which he has stumbled. He should have noticed by now that this doesn’t play well with the public. ” Ken Early, The Irish Times, 2017

 

      2. “Guardiola: ‘Did you hear Benatia’s instructions?’

          Kimmich: ‘Sorry Pep, I didn’t.’

          Guardiola: ‘F***! You were meant to move into centre midfield!’

          Kimmich: ‘I’m really sorry. I just didn’t hear him.’

          Guardiola: ‘I wanted you to move in front of the defensive line and maintain that position but instead you moved away from that organising position and we lost control. I need you to listen when people pass on my instructions.’

          Kimmich: ‘I’m so sorry. I had no idea…’

Up to that point, the conversation is all hairdryer treatment but then Guardiola hugs his young player.

          Guardiola: ‘You were brilliant out there today, Josh. Really, really good. I told you could do it!’

          Kimmich: ‘Thanks Pep. It was a hard game but I did okay in the end.’

          Guardiola: ‘What do you mean “okay”? You f***ing aced it. You were b****y sensational, Josh. Sensational! I’m so proud of you.’

In that conversation there is a hint of how Guardiola works: the intensity, the passion, and obsession with detail, which, to be frank, begins to grate on players by the third or fourth year but can transform teams in the early days. But it also shows the humanity and his ability to inspire young men. It is a formula all the great managers have.” Rob Draper, MailOnline, 2017

 

The paradox of international football

“Globalisation is blurring national styles, but tradition, perpetuated by coaches, players, pundits and fans, is strong enough that they remain distinguishable. What became apparent in the writing of this book is that every nation came fairly quickly to recognise its strengths, and that no nation seems to trust them. Brazilian football is all about flair and improvisation, but it looks yearningly at the defensive organisation of the Italians. Italian football is all about cynicism and tactical intelligence, but it admires and fears the physical courage of the English. English football is about tenacity and energy, but it feels it ought to ape the technique of the Brazilians.”

Jonathan Wilson, Inverting The Pyramid

The best piece of advice Wenger gave henry

arsene wenger thierry henry

Henry has revealed how in his early career, he would blame others for failing to pass to him, a trait that Wenger encouraged him to lose.

“One of the best [pieces of] advice I have received in my career was from Arsene, who told me: ‘Stop asking yourself the wrong question’,” the former Gunners striker told Unisport.

“What he means by that is, I would’ve said to myself: ‘Oh, he didn’t see me, oh, he didn’t pass me the ball.’ I would have always talked about you [the team-mate].

“Arsene said to me: ‘What could you have done for him to see you?’

“I was always aware of what can you do to help [the team-mate]. Instead of arguing, I’d try to find a way to make you better.”